Environment well-being refers to conditions under which the land, sea, and air are clean and safe, where our biome is protected, and where precious natural resources are conserved. As an island community, our natural resources are both fragile and finite and our very existence depends on their careful stewardship. Hawaii’s ecosystem is particularly vulnerable to environmental threats that originate far beyond our shores. Potential threats include rising sea levels, decreasing drinking water supplies, increasing air and ocean temperatures, shifting climate zones and biomes, and changing wind patterns.  

Metrics that broadly describe environmental stewardship in Hawaii at the state level are available in the Aloha+ Challenge Dashboard, which monitors progress toward the statewide commitment to achieve six interconnected sustainability goals by 2030. These goals include Clean Energy Transformation, Local Food Production and Consumption, Natural Resource Management, Solid Waste Reduction, Smart Sustainable Communities, and Green Workforce and Education. 

Identifying indicators of environmental well-being at the community level presents greater challenges. Currently, no consistent direct metrics of key environmental indicators such as water and air quality, environmental stewardship behaviors, and access to environmental resources exist at the sub-county level. Moving forward, we are exploring opportunities for collecting community-level data on conditions and needs from an environmental perspective. 


Indicators Dashboard

Our Indicators Dashboard can help you begin exploring specific measures of the 10 well-being domains. Interested in learning how each indicator varies over time and across Hawaii’s communities? Click below to head to our dashboard: 


Data Plotter Tool

What’s the relationship between various well-being indicators? And how might this relationship vary from island to island, or region to region? Click below to explore the answers to these and similar questions using our Data Plotter: